NEWS HUB

Cutting-edge artistry ushers in troubling new era

By Sandra Abma
CBC News

This week on the list: a mind-boggling look at humankind's impact on our planet, a showcase of animation's best and brightest, and a big sound on a couple of small stages.

Anthropocene

Anthropocene, on now at the National Gallery of Canada, is a vivid voyage into the environmental catastrophe wrought by we humans in our pursuit of minerals, industrialization and urbanization.

At the centre of this interactive multi-media experience are the immense, high-resolution photographs of Edward Burtynsky, simultaneously frightening and eerily beautiful depictions of deforestation and urban blight.

The images have been been augmented with 3D technology that can be activated by a smart phone or tablet, allowing viewers to virtually step inside the images. (If you don't own one, tablets are available for loan the exhibition entrance.)

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'Reconnecting us to the wastelands': AGO's new photo exhibit shows what humanity's doing to the planet

By Trevor Dunn
CBC News

A new exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario seeks to reveal the way human activity is transforming the planet.

Just how the cumulative action of seven billion people is shaping the environment may be difficult, if not impossible, to grasp.

But the oversized photographs by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky have always sought to at least bring us a bit closer to that truth.

"These are human landscapes. We walk away and leave them as dead. But they are part of us and we need to understand them," Burtynsky said in an interview.

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Edward Burtynsky establishes photography grant with Governor General's Award prize money

CBC News

Renowned Toronto photographer Edward Burtynsky has decided to take his Governor General's Award prize money and give it all away.

Burtynsky was honoured by the Canada Council on Monday for his work promoting environmentalism through global industrial landscape photography — and now he wants to help others promote their own unique artistic visions.That's why he's turning the $25,000 financial portion of the award into an annual grant to help emerging Canadian photographers create and publish their first photography books. 

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